Who we are

Partners

          

Partners

Technical Note

"Below we list the diverse sources for the data and information indexed and processed: groups, scale, date of the last update or update frequency, and details of the same. The spatializable themes are available in both types of map: the map of Brazil on the site home and the various detailed maps available on the record for each CU, Mosaic or Ecological Corridor. ISA is not responsible for the information consumed directly from other institutions, only for combining their spatial databases, which, given the differences in the databases and platforms used (Google Maps), should be interpreted in an illustrative form rather than analytically".

 

Conservation Units (CUs) and Indigenous Lands (ILs)

Source: Instituto Socioambiental (ISA), Protected Areas Monitoring Program and Geoprocessing Laboratory

Scale: 1:250,000 e 1:1,000,000

Date: daily update

Daily monitoring of the Federal Official Gazette and the Official Gazettes of the states of Legal Amazonia (with the exception of Amapá, which did not provide internet access to its Official Gazette and the daily monitoring began in December 2016) by the Protected Areas Monitoring Program allows the team to monitor newly created and/or recognized protected areas (PAs) and alterations made to the boundaries of existing areas. Based on the descriptive memorandum contained in the decrees (CU) and ministerial directives (IL) creating and recognizing the areas, which include technical information describing the boundaries of the PAs using geographic coordinates and administrative borders, the team plots these boundaries using a cartographic base of 1:250,000 in the case of CUs and ILs in Amazonia, and 1:1,000,000 for the remainder of the country. The bases used are SIVAM 1:250,000 for Amazonia and ISA’s base of 1:1,000,000 for the rest of Brazil. Daily monitoring of official publications also allows the team to keep track of administrative acts related to conservation units, such as approval of administrative instruments (management plans, administration plans, public use plans and so on), investigations, the creation, proposal and approval of the regulations of the administrative councils, actions relating to regularization of land ownership, such as compulsory purchases, compensations for Legal Reserves and the Grant for Real Right of Use (CDRU), among others. Given that official bulletins are made available on the internet at different moments in time and do not always include previous editions, allowing the corresponding information to be validated and complemented, a consultation was undertaken with the relevant administrative bodies (OEMAS and ICMBio) in August 2010, incorporating further information.

 

Biomes and Phytophysionomies

Source: Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), linked to the Ministry of Planning, Budget and Management. Scale: 1:5,000,000

Date: September 2010.

Clusters: Owing to the large number of different kinds of contact between phytophysionomies, all have been grouped into a single class denominated ‘contacts’ where displayed on the web page maps.


River Basins

Source: National Water Agency (ANA), linked to the Ministry of the Environment (MMA)

Scale: 1:1,000,000

Clusters: river basis level 1 and 2.

Date: September 2010.

 

Deforestation 

Source: PRODES (Satellite Monitoring of Brazilian Amazonian Rainforest Project) at the National Institute of Spatial Investigations (INPE), linked to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MCT)

Scale: Thematic image classified in accordance with the key used by the PRODES Digital Project in the base representation (60m x 60m resolution (*) expressed in decimal degrees). This data was elaborated by combining all the classified individual scenes that make up the region of Amazonia in a single thematic map.

Date: October 2014, using data compiled since 1997.

 

Fires

Source: National Institute of Spatial Investigations (INPE), linked to the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MCTI)

Coverage area of spot: A heat spot indicates the existence of fire in a single picture element (pixel), which varies from 1 km x 1 km to 5 km x 4 km. This pixel may contain one or more distinct heat spots, although only one spot is indicated. If the fire is extensive, it will be seen in some of the adjacent pixels: in other words, various outbreaks are associated with a single large fires. Satellite and channels available: using all the satellites with optical sensors operating in thermal spectral range – 4um average – whose signal can be received by INPE. At the moment (July 2007) AVHRR data is processed from the polar orbit satellites NOAA-15, NOAA-16, NOAA-17, NOAA-18 and NOAA-19, along with MODIS images from the polar orbit satellites NASA TERRA and AQUA, and images from the geostationary satellites GOES-12 and MSG-2. Each polar orbit satellite produces at least one set of images per day, while the geostationary satellites can generate several images per hour, meaning that INPE processes a total of more than 100 images per day specifically to detect heat spots. Data is received at the Cachoeira Paulista station in São Paulo and the Cuiabá station in Mato Grosso.

Date: Daily update, the fires recorded the previous day always being shown.

 

Mining titles

Source: Department of Mineral Production (DNPM), linked to Ministry of Mines and Energy

Date: 04/01/2016.

Clusters: Due to the large number, titles were grouped according to 4 different stages in the process:

Clusters                            Phase

1. Interest in research: request for research authorization

2. Under research or availability: research authorization; availability

3. Authorization for the extraction: extraction request; prospecting request; licensing request; extraction registration request

4. Under extraction: extraction concession; prospecting; licensing; extraction registration

 

Energy

Source: Agency of Electrical Energy (ANEEL), linked to the Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME)

Scale: n.a.

Date: 02/02/2016

Clusters: Grouped by type (PCH – Small Hydroelectric Plant, UHE – Hydroelectric Plant, UTE – Thermoelectric Plant) and by phase (operation, construction, concession and planning)

 

Caves

Source: Database of the National Cave Investigation and Conservation Centre (CECAV) of the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (ICMBio), linked to the Ministry of the Environment (MMA)

Date: 31/12/2015

In 2004, CECAV created its database on the locations of Brazil’s caves, which receives a permanent inflow of information from other databases, speleological studies, bibliographic material and especially fieldwork conducted by its technicians and environmental analysts. The data does not represent all the caves existing in Brazil. It includes only the small portion of caves already explored by individuals, groups or institutions, the results of which have been published in various mediums of communication, and systemized, georeferenced and analyzed by CECAV. Since 2005, CECAV has provided online access to part of this database, including the data either validated by its technical team or showing basic levels of reliability, obtained from trustworthy sources, cited by more than one sources or whose geospatialization matches the descriptions accompanying the data. Currently the CECAV database contains around 17,000 records, relating to more than 7,000 caverns. However we know that this data does not reflect the true extent of cave systems in Brazil. Hence CECAV is conducting an inventory of Brazil’s natural subterranean caves.

Geospatialized caves based on the integration of data coming from: field surveys conducted by the CECAV technical team; studies and research submitted to CECAV/Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation; specialized bibliography; CNC – Brazilian National Cave Register, Brazilian Speleology Society SBE; CODEX – National Cave Register, REDESPELEO BRASIL. (Source: CECAV/ICMBio, September 2010)

 

News

Source: Diverse, specified in each case.

Date: daily update

One of the daily activities of the Protected Areas Monitoring Program involves indexing related news reports through an active search in primary federal and state sources, principally from the states of Legal Amazonia. Around 50 sources are monitored weekly and approximately 30 daily. As well as news reports directly related to specific conservation units available on this site, the Program also indexes those referring to correlated themes, such as Indigenous Lands and Peoples, socioenvironmental policies, forestry policy, pressures and threats on protected areas, local initiatives, and so on. Currently the news database covers more than 100,000 news items.

 

Ramsar Sites

Source: Ramsar Sites Information Service (RSIS)

Date: May 2010

Technical Note

Website staff

Current Staff

Overall Coordination

Fany Pantaleoni Ricardo - Anthropologist, Monitoring of Protected Areas Program Coordinator

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst


Content organization and edition

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst

Marina Spindel - Environmental Manager

 

Monitoring of Information and content production

Helena Chiaretti Leonel Ferreira - Treinee (Biology) 

Marina Spindel - Environmental Manager

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst

 

Web Production

Alex Piaz - Analyst and Web development

João Ricardo Rampinelli - Analyst and Web development

Marina Spindel - Environmental Manager

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst

Silvio Carlos - Analyst and Web development


Geoprocessing

Alicia Rolla - Geographer

Cícero Augusto - Cartographic engineer, Geoprocessing coordinator

Rosimeire Rurico - Geographer, Geoprocessing technician

William Pereira de Lima - Trainee (Geography)

 

Former Staff

Overall Coordination

Fany Pantaleoni Ricardo - Anthropologist, Monitoring of Protected Areas Program Coordinator

Alicia Rolla - Geographer, Monitoring of Protected Areas Program Adjunct Coordinator


Content organization and edition

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst

 

Monitoring of Information and Content Production

Bruna Dell Agnolo - Trainee (Environmental Management)

Bruno Marianno - Environmental Manager, technical assistant on socioenvironmental development research

Francisco d'Albertas Gomes de Carvalho - Trainee (Biology)

Lia Taruiap Troncarelli - Trainee (Environmental Management)

Luana Lopes de Lucca- Treinee (Environmental Management)

Marina Spindel - Treinee (Environmental Management)

Nurit Rachel Bensusan - Masters in Ecology, prolabore

Paula Zaterka Giroldo - Trainee (Biology)

Rosely Alvim Sanches - Masters in Environmental Sciences, prolabore

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst

Thais Bucci Francisco - Oceanographer, Trainee (Environmental Management)

 

Web Production

Alex Piaz - Analyst and Web development

Bruno Marianno - Environmental Manager, technical assistant on socioenvironmental development research

Eduardo Ultima - Design

João Ricardo Rampinelli - Analyst and Web development

Marcelo Lopes Oliveira - Web Programming;

Marina Spindel - Treinee (Environmental Management)

Silvia de Melo Futada – Masters in Ecology, Socioenvironmental development researcher and analyst

Silvio Carlos - Analyst and Web development


Geoprocessing

Alexandre Degan - Geographer, Geoprocessing analyst

Alicia Rolla - Geographer, Monitoring of Protected Areas Program Adjunct Coordinator

Cícero Augusto - Cartographic engineer, Geoprocessing coordinator

Paulo Henrique Aguiar - Geographer, Geoprocessing technician

Rosimeire Rurico - Geographer, Geoprocessing technician

Thomas Gallois - Geography student, technical assistant on socioenvironmental development investigation

William Pereira de Lima - Trainee (Geography)

 

 

Collaborators

Adriana Ramos, Ana Paula Leite Prates, Caroline Jeanne Delelis, David Leonardo Bouças da Silva, Enrique Svirsky , Gabriella Contoli, Henry Philippe Ibanez de Novion, Juliana Santilli, Kelly Bonach, Maurício Mercadante, Michele de Sá Dechoum, Nádia Bandeira Sacenco Kornijezuc, Patrícia Pinha, Raul Silva Telles do Vale, Sônia Wiedmann, Thiago Mota Cardoso 

 

Translations (Prolabore)

Inglês - Harold Martin Wright III (Masters in Ecology), Anthony R. (Tony) Gross (anthropologist) and David Rodgers (anthropologist)

Espanhol - Alfredo Zea (jornalista)


We would like to thank all photographers, professionals or not, that collaborated giving us pictures, of which credits appear by each image.


"All rights reserved. To reproduce excerpts of the content it is necessary to mention the name of the author (whenever possible) and the Conservation Areas in Brazil/Instituto Socioambiental (ISA). To reproduce in websites, give credit and the link to the seccion of the website from which the text was withdrawn. Reproduction of photos and illustrations is prohibited."

Website staff

The Protected Areas Monitoring Program

 

The Instituto Socioambiental (ISA) is a Public Interest Civil Society Organization (OSCIP, Portuguese acronym), that is, a non-profit organization. Founded on 22 April 1994, ISA inherited the tangible and intangible heritage of 15 years' experience of the Indigenous Peoples in Brazil Program, an initiative of the Documentation and Information Ecumenical Center (PIB/CEDI, Portuguese acronym) and of the Indigenous Rights Nucleus (NDI, Portuguese acronym) of Brasilia, two organizations well-known for their work with issues related to Indigenous rights in Brazil.

ISA was created to propose solutions to care for social and environmental matters, and has as main objective to protect assets as well as collective and diffuse rights related to the environment, to cultural heritage and to Indigenous and traditional communities. Since then, ISA has developed several projects and activities associated to such projects. The Protected Areas Monitoring Program produces researches and information about processes of creation and implementation of Indigenous Lands and Conservation Areas by means of propositions in forums, networks and consultations that affect public policies and governmental actions aimed at defending collective rights of protection and conservation. This work was initiated in 1983 by CEDI, and was extended in 1992 with the purpose to monitor protected areas and other public areas. In 1994, CEDI joined other institutions and individuals to form the Instituto Socioambiental (ISA).

Daily researches on protected areas, environmental policies and Indigenous issues are carried out taking as reference national and state official publications, newspapers and magazines, as well as information from a broad network of collaborators, among other sources.

The monitoring of governmental and private economic projects such as hydroelectric power plants, gas pipelines, roads, waterways, mining and logging, and their relation to Indigenous Lands and Conservations Areas, allows us to follow-up sustainability projects that support Indigenous peoples, aiming at economic development policies and actions from civil society organizations to promote environmental sustainability.

Georeferencing is measured by the Protected Areas System (SisArp, Portuguese acronym), which enables information production according to diverse themes and locations.

The program uses a number of online tools to disclose updated information in a daily manner, as well as print publications. Our website has sections with information on Indigenous peoples and lands, including a segment specially directed to children and youngsters.

The joint work of the Monitoring Program with the Georeferencing Area was the basis for articulating and creating the Amazonian Network of Georeferenced Socio-Environmental Information (RAISG, Portuguese acronym), which gathers institutions from eight Amazonian countries to establish a qualified database of the region, promoting the generation of knowledge and support of local actors. ISA coordinates the network and is responsible for data consolidation, standardization and systematization.

 

See more information on the Program's website.

 

The Protected Areas Monitoring Program